Track Descriptions

Accounting Information Systems (SIGASYS)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGASYS

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Scott R. Boss, Bentley University, sboss@bentley.edu (primary contact)
  2. Brad S. Trinkle, Mississippi State University, brad.trinkle@msstate.edu

Description of Track:

The Accounting Information Systems track highlights research that focuses on the link between accounting and information systems, including topics that range from IT governance to interorganizational information systems and draws from a variety of disciplines like accounting, psychology, sociology, cognitive science, behavioral science, economics, politics, computer science, and information technology.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Adoption and Diffusion of Information Technology (SIGADIT)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGADIT

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Geneviève Bassellier, McGill University, genevieve.bassellier@mcgill.ca (primary contact)
  2. Christy M K Cheung, Hong Kong Baptist University, ccheung@hkbu.edu.hk
  3. Sven Laumer, University of Bamberg, sven.laumer@uni-bamberg.de

Description of Track:

The extant diffusion and adoption literature has improved our understanding of how IT is utilized by individual, group, and organization. In turn, we now have keen insights into relevant topics such as digital innovation, digital business models, and factors that affect IT implementation, to name a few. With the digital economy now widespread there is still much work to be done in many exciting new areas.  We need to investigate the potential of new innovations, while also examining downsides of diffusion and adoption. Issues such as IS misuse, obsessive addiction, technostress, and information overload all have become important areas to investigate. This track seeks to attract research that theoretically and/or practically provides valuable insights to the adoption and diffusion of innovation IT at the individual, group, organizational, industry, or societal levels. This can include the use of all type of methodologies to explore different types of IT innovations.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Advances in Information Systems Research (General Track)

Track Chair:

  1. Stacie Petter, Baylor University, stacie_petter@baylor.edu (primary contact)

Description of Track

This track serves as the primary point of contribution and subsequent publication of innovative research on information systems across a wide range of topic areas, particularly those topics not addressed by other tracks.  This track showcases unique and leading edge regarding the state, practice, antecedents and consequences of management information systems as a field of practice, as an artifact of business and its processes, and as a scholarly field of endeavor.

We welcome any forward-thinking and unique views of information systems as minitracks.  We also specifically seek mini-tracks affiliated with AIS Special Interest Groups that are innovative and emergent and have not yet found specific conference affiliation for development and evolution.

This track serves as a high-level congregation of the converging interests of researchers in the field, with a particular interest in research that might not find good fit with mainstream areas of information systems research. This track welcomes the innovative, the provocative, and the experimental in regards to both topical and methodological coverage.

This track serves as a focal nexus and clearinghouse for leading thought on information systems research. The track offers opportunities for authors to submit papers of quality and innovation.  As such, the notion of the Advances in Information Systems track is thematically consistent with that of the affiliated IS journal to which we intend to provide journal publication opportunities.

Opportunities in Leading Journals:
Invitations for selected papers to be submitted to The Data Base for Advances in Information Systems for potential publication.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Cultural Issues in IS (SIG CCRIS; SIG Culture)

Sponsoring SIGs: SIG CCRIS; SIG Culture

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Pnina Fichman, Indiana University,  fichman@indiana.edu (primary contact)
  2. Mohammad Salehan, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, msalehan@cpp.edu
  3. Barbara Krumay WU Vienna, Institute for Information Management and Control, Krumay@wu.ac.at

Description of Track:

This track intends to gather researchers and doctoral students who conduct research and publications related to culture in IS. “Culture in IS” refers to at least 4 meanings: national cultures, corporate culture, cultural industries and “Internet culture”.

  • “National cultures” refers to effect that national cultures and ethnic cultures have on the Internet and online behaviour such as use of social media or buying behaviour on e-commerce sites. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have provided the infrastructure for multinational businesses, created new cultural connections irrespective of geographic boundaries and distances, and allowed an increasingly mobile global population to be connected to their friends, families, and cultures no matter where they are. The issues surrounding global, international, and cross-cultural issues in Information Systems (IS) attracted much scholarly attention and have been explored under myriad contexts.
  • “Corporate culture” refers to the values and interpretations developed within companies are carried out through mission or vision, and their relations to information systems. For instance, an Enterprise Social Network may be a way to promote a specific idea of a corporate culture, but may also fail because it does not fit with the beliefs or interpretations of the employees. In a less normative meaning, it may also refer to the social capital or the symbolic capital issues within companies.
  • “cultural industries” refers to the use of information technologies (IT) in “cultural industries,” defined as any kind of creative industry that embodies one or more cultures, including but not limited to fine arts, performing arts, museums, cultural heritage, movies, music, humanities, entertainment, architecture, or tourism.
  • “Internet culture,” is both represented and embodied by the Internet millennial generation and the awareness of how to leverage the Internet and mobile resources.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Data Science and Analytics for Decision Support (SIGDSA)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGDSA

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Ashish Gupta, Auburn University, ashish.gupta@auburn.edu (primary contact)
  2. Sagnika Sen, Pennsylvania State University, sagnika.sen@psu.edu
  3. Uzma Raja, The University of Alabama, uraja@cba.ua.edu

Description of Track:

Recent technological innovations and novel applications that are being driven by data science & analytics are changing the way organizations and the society-at-large consumes data and information in an unprecedented way. For instance, big data approaches supported by social media computing and the Internet of Things (IoT) is revolutionizing the way individuals communicate and live as well as how organizations operate and develop strategies. It has led to the need for novel tools and techniques for advanced analytics to gain valuable insights for decision makers and organizations. The ability to manage big data and glean insightful knowledge is also leading towards process-centric transformations in organizations with respect to how they operate and maintain their competitive advantage. At a higher level, big data and analytics applications are able to drive positive impact on the society in the areas of food safety, energy and sustainability.

Organizations are allocating greater resources to enhance and develop new decision support applications driven by advanced analytics to garner insights and knowledge. As organizations transform into data and analytics centric enterprises (e.g. health insurance companies), more research is needed not only on the technical aspects of analytics such as application of new data science approaches like deep learning, computing infrastructure, but also on various other organizational issues in the analytics context. Examples include managerial, strategic, leadership, data governance issues; process innovation, inter-organizational issues, etc. Research contributions in this space can inform industry on handling various organizational and technical opportunities along with various challenges associated with building and executing big data driven organization.

This track seeks original research that promotes technical, theoretical, design science, pedagogical, and behavioral research as well as emerging applications in the innovative areas of analytics and big data.

Research areas in big data, analytics include but are not limited to: data analytics & visualization for varied data  (or sources) such as sensors or IoT data, text, multimedia, clickstreams, user-generated content involving issues dealing with curation, management and infrastructure for (big) data; standards, semantics, privacy, security and legal issues in big data, analytics and KM; performance analysis, intelligence and scientific discovery in big data, analytics and KM; analytics applications in smart cities, sustainability, smart grids, detecting financial fraud, digital learning, healthcare, criminal justice, energy, environmental and scientific domains, and the like; business process management applications such as process discovery, conformance and mining using analytics and KM; cost-sensitive, value-oriented data analytics and utility-based data mining; data-driven decision analysis and optimization.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Digital Agility

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Jongwoo (Jonathan) Kim, University of Massachusetts Boston, jonathan.kim@umb.edu (primary contact)
  2. Lan Cao, Old Dominion University, lcao@odu.edu
  3. Kannan Mohan, City University of New York, kannan.mohan@baruch.cuny.edu

Description of Track:

Organizational agility is a leading success factor in the digital era. Organizations have recognized the importance of the need to swiftly sense and respond to changes in the marketplace. Agility can span from operational to strategic in that organizations can focus specifically on streamlining their operations or consider agility at the strategic level focusing on game-changing opportunities. Depending on their focus, organizations need to adapt their approach to agility. This track explores relationship between IT and organizational agility. How does IT play an instrumental role in enabling organizational agility by delivering new products and services, and sensing and responding quickly to shifting customer attitudes and market place opportunities and risks?  On the other hand, how does organizational agility facilitate digital transformation and enable the business to unleash its full potential?

This track is open for various types of research including those that use quantitative, qualitative, and theoretical approaches to examining IT-enabled organizational agility. Topics for this track include, but are not limited to the following:
–  Organizational agility and digital transformation
– Agile software development methods
– Agility and new technologies such as mobile, social, cloud and big data analytics
– Theoretical lenses for examining digital agility
– Complexity and digital agility
– Digital agility and competition
– Business intelligence and organizational agility
– Digital agility in addressing sustainability issues
– Digital agility and sourcing strategies
– Digital agility and business performance/capabilities

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

eBusiness, eCommerce, and Digital Commerce (SIGeBIZ)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGeBIZ

Track Co-Chairs:

  1.  Matt Nelson, Illinois State University,  mlnelso@ilstu.edu (primary contact)
  2.  Michael Shaw, University of Illinois,  mjshaw@illinois.edu
  3. Troy Strader, Drake University,  troy.strader@drake.edu
  4. Chandra Subramaniam, University of North Carolina – Charlotte, csubrama@uncc.edu

Description of Track:

For AMCIS 2018, SIGeBIZ is proposing the focus of the tracks to be on technical, behavioral, design and strategic research issues associated with Digital Commerce.  This encompasses studies of Internet-enabled transactions between consumers, businesses, and other organizations, as well as use of Internet technologies within organizations.  The studies may utilize any research methodology.  Related online business topics such as legal, ethical, and societal issues would also fit in this track.

The eBusiness and eCommerce Special Interest Group (SIG) has assisted with coordinating research tracks at the America’s Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS) for more than 16 years.  Over the course of this timeframe, the eBIZ SIG has greatly benefited from a stable, responsive and reliable group of mini-track chairs, SIG leaders, contributing authors, reviewers and panelists.  The eBIZ SIG tracks received approximately 45 submissions in 2013, 30 paper submissions in 2014, 58 paper submissions in 2015, 45 paper submissions in 2016 and 55 paper submissions in 2017. There is little doubt of the continued and growing interest in this line of study.

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

In the past, this track has led to Special Issues in the journal Information Systems and e-Business Management (ISEB), as well as in academic book series in Springers Lecture-Notes Series.

(http://www.springer.com/business+%26+management/business+information+systems/journal/10257)

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

E-government (SIGEGOV)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGEGOV

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Lemuria Carter, Virginia Commonwealth University, Ldcarter@vcu.edu (primary contact)
  2. Vishanth Weerakkody, Brunel University, Vishanth.Weerakkody@brunel.ac.uk
  3. Yogesh K. Dwivedi, Swansea University, ykdwivedi@gmail.com
  4. Marijn Janssen, Delft University of Technology, m.f.w.h.a.janssen@tudelft.nl

Description of Track:

E-government explores the digital transformation of the public sector. Information Communication Technology (ICT) has been invading public administration and is changing the ways governments operate. Initially, e-government was focussed on alternative service delivery mechanism, but nowadays e-government is now considered as a key enabler of public sector transformation for improving governance, including transparency and accountability and citizen participation in democratic processes and policy making. E-government changes the relationships between the government and the public and covers topics like multi-channel service delivery, creating transparency, evidence-based policy-making, transformational government, adoption and open government. Agencies across the globe consistently identify innovative ways to use emerging tools, trends and technologies such as big data, open data, blockchain, and the Internet of Things to improve government services. Many governments have embraced these efforts, but struggle with implementation and adopting ICTs as part of the service delivery and policy-making processes. Within the information systems field e-government has its own niche in terms which include practical and theoretical relevance.

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

Selected papers will be invited for consideration to the following leading journals in the area of electronic government:

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Enterprise System, (SIGEntSys)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGEntSys

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Renée Pratt, University of Massachusetts Amherst, rpratt@isenberg.umass.edu (primary contact)
  2. Randy V Bradley, The University of Tennessee, rbradley@utk.edu

Description of Track:

The introduction, use and maintenance of enterprise systems (ES) require a significant investment of organizational energy and resources. As such, ES represent the largest IS investment organizations are likely to make. Many organizations are now upgrading, replacing, or extending their original ES. Early versions of ES provided back office functionality that integrated a range of internal business processes, whereas modern ES have evolved to include support for a variety of front office and inter-organizational activities and processes, such as customer relationship management (CRM), human capital management (HCM), and supply chain management (SCM). The design of such large integrated systems represents a major technical challenge, requiring new ways of thinking about business processes, system development, and enterprise architecture.

Because of both their size and their integrated nature, ES are difficult to implement, and are associated with a variety of organizational changes. Organizations expect, but unfortunately do not always realize, significant benefits from their sizable investments in ES. Because of the importance of ES in organizations, educators continue to explore approaches for introducing ES into IS and other business curricula. As such this track will investigate issues to pertaining large-scale systems adoption, implementation, and integration, academic, and practice-based case studies on ES best practices, interdisciplinary concerns with specialized ES in areas such as healthcare and supply chain management, emerging delivery models, and enterprise and business architecture.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Green IS and Sustainability (SIGGreen)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGGreen

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Chadi Aoun, Carnegie Mellon University, chadi@cmu.edu (primary contact)
  2. Pratyush Bharati, University of Massachusetts, Boston, pratyush.bharati@umb.edu
  3. Savanid (Nui) Vatanasakdakul, Macquarie University, savanid.vatanasakdakul@mq.edu.au

Description of Track:

Sustainability and climate change are global issues, with many cultural, organizational, technical, social, regulatory, economic, and individual dimensions. Just as computer-based information systems have been a driving force for societal progress, Green IS can be a driving force for strategic sustainable solutions in organizations and communities.

Green IS enables the transformative power of information systems to support the multiple dimensions of sustainability. It addresses the world’s greatest challenges including shrinking access to non-renewable resources, decreased energy and food security, and environmental degradation due to climate change. IS can play a pivotal role in enabling sustainable solutions, which greatly increase the effectiveness and efficiency of modern communities and enterprises. Consequently, IS research can contribute in such transformation towards a multidimensional perspective to sustainability.

This track is open to any type of research within scope of Green IS and Sustainability as well as those that adapt research and industry experience into teaching cases and modules.

Potential topics include:

  • Managing Green IT/IS systems
  • Green IS as a digital disruptor
  • Governance and strategy in Green IS and Sustainability
  • Green Business Process Management
  • Decision support for logistics and supply chain processes
  • IS-enabled collaborative processes for mobilization towards sustainability
  • IS-enabled multidisciplinary collaborations for sustainability
  • IS-enabled smart cities and sustainable communities
  • Designing and implementing systems for the Smart Grid
  • End user acceptance and adoption of smart grid technologies
  • Green HCI – Changing human attitudes and behaviors through information
  • Energy informatics – analyzing, designing, and implementing processes to increase the efficiency of energy demand and supply systems
  • Resource informatics – designing and implementing systems to manage metals, minerals, water, forests, etc.
  • Designing and implementing systems that measure and validate the impact of sustainable business practices and policies
  • Critical competencies and curricula for Green IS graduates and professionals
  • IS-enabled sustainability of educational campuses and institutions
  • IS to support carbon management, accounting and reporting
  • Sustainable development in transitional and developing countries
  • Global and cultural issues in Green IS and Sustainability

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Healthcare Informatics & Health Information Technology (SIGHealth)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGHealth

Track Co-Chairs:   

  1. Richard Klein, Florida International University, rklein@FIU.edu (primary contact)
  2. Sweta Sneha, Kennesaw State University, ssneha@kennesaw.edu

Description of Track:

The Healthcare Informatics and Health Information Technology (HIT) track seeks to promote research into ground breaking technology innovations and applications within the healthcare sector, while incorporating interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches beyond the traditional information systems (IS) and health information technology (HIT) disciplines. Information systems and technology (IT) innovations offer significant potential to transform the delivery of care, to improve the quality and efficiency of the healthcare system, to enhance interactions between patients/caregivers and providers, and to enable greater access to the latest advancements in treatments, among other accomplishments and outcomes. Academic efforts within the Healthcare Technology and Systems track should demonstrate novel work within the IS discipline as well as reference perspectives including computer science, economics, organizational behavior, public policy, public health, software/electrical engineering, management, and strategy, among others. Completed research and research-in-progress topics might include, opportunities and challenges faced within the current healthcare sector; advances in healthcare information technologies (HIT), electronic health (e-health), telemedicine, and mobile health (m-health), among other innovative technological applications; as well as healthcare industry-specific issues related to traditional IS research concerns, including adoption and diffusion, systems design and implementation, and IS success.

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

Health Policy and Technology (HPT), Health Systems

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Human-Computer Interaction (SIGHCI)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGHCI

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Miguel I. Aguirre-Urreta, Texas Tech University, miguel.aguirre-urreta@ttu.edu (primary contact)
  2. Dezhi Wu Southern, Utah University, wu@suu.edu
  3. Jeff Jenkins, Brigham Young University, jeffrey_jenkins@byu.edu

Description of Track:

The AMCIS 2018 HCI Track will provide a forum for AIS members to present, discuss, and explore a wide range of issues related to Human-Computer Interaction and Information Systems. Human Computer Interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary area that has attracted researchers, educators, and practitioners from several disciplines. It essentially deals with the design, evaluation, adoption, and use of information technology, with a common focus on improved user performance and experience. New and exciting research opportunities are emerging, including issues and challenges concerning people’s interactions with various information technologies that can be examined from an organizational, managerial, psychological, social, or cultural perspective. This track welcomes papers that aim at advancing our understanding of human‐computer interaction at the individual, work group, organization, or society levels. Submissions may use any type of research methods.

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

THCI has agreed to fast-track the ‘best-in-track’ papers as well as any other that the track-chairs deem ready.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

ICTs in Global Development (SIGGlobDev)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGGlobDev

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Narcyz Roztocki, State University of New York at New Paltz and Kozminski University, roztockn@newpaltz.edu, (primary contact)
  2. Renata Gabryelczyk, University of Warsaw, r.gabryelczyk@wne.uw.edu.pl
  3. Janice Sipior, Villanova University, janice.sipior@villanova.edu

Description of Track:

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have a major impact on economic and societal development. Though developing, emerging, and transitional economies play an increasingly important role in the global market, mainstream information systems research continues to focus on the relatively small group of countries with highly developed economies. The business, social, and legal environments of less developed economies often mandate that ICT implementation and management apply different practices and models from those conceived and tested in highly developed countries. The intention of this track is to encourage more research and publications on ICT focused on developing and emerging markets and communities.

Thus, this track serves as a forum for research on the appropriate use and diffusion of information and communication technologies and associated management practices in the distinctive environments of developing, emerging, and transitional economies.

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

Information Technology for Development

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Information Security and Privacy (SIGSEC)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGSEC

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Sanjay Goel, University of Albany, SUNY, goel@albany.edu (primary contact)
  2. Dave Biros, Oklahoma State University, david.biros@okstate.edu
  3. Herbert J. Mattord, Kennesaw State University, hmattord@kennesaw.edu
  4. Jordan Shropshire, University of South Alabama, jshropshire@southalabama.edu

Description of Track:

Cyber Security remains a key challenge for organizations despite massive investments over the last two decades. While technological advancements have been made to improve cyber defense, human vulnerabilities have become the weakest link in security. High profile events such as defections, espionage, and massive data breaches have led the public to question their own expectations of privacy. While there is an abundance of practices and techniques for employing cyber security, many hard problems remain unanswered.

The purpose of this track is to provide a forum for theoretical developments, empirical research findings, case studies, methodologies, artifacts, and other high-quality manuscripts.  Sponsored by SIGSec, we seek to address important questions arising from emerging developments in information security, such as: security analytics, financial crimes, security analytics, and digital forensics? How do system defenders share information to mitigate vulnerabilities and exploits? Does pervasive data collection deter privacy-conscious individuals? Do regulations and policies influence employee security behaviors and organizational security postures?

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

High quality papers will be considered for special issues of Database and Information Systems Frontiers (ISF)

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

IS in Education, IS Curriculum, Education and Teaching Cases (SIGED)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGED

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Asli Akbulut, Grand Valley State University, akbuluta@gvsu.edu (primary contact)
  2. Rhonda Syler, University of Arkansas, rsyler@walton.uark.edu
  3. Craig Van Slyke, Northern Arizona University, Craig.VanSlyke@nau.edu

Description of Track:

Information systems (IS) educators face a number of challenges in the current environment, including dealing with declining enrolments, preparing students for the changes in the profession and updating curriculum to integrate new ideas and technologies. These challenges make sharing IS education-related knowledge and practices especially critical. Therefore, it is critical that leading conferences, such as AMCIS, include a strong IS education track. As the official AIS special interest group on education, SIGED is uniquely positioned to organize an IS education track.

This track provides an opportunity for IS educators and researchers to exchange ideas, techniques, and applications through a combination of workshops, panels and paper presentations.  Parallel to the 2018 Conference theme, “Digital Disruption” the focus is on innovation, disruptive technologies, and quality advances in IS and MIS instruction and curriculum. Different submission topics are welcome, ranging from papers aimed at improving the teaching of specific courses to “big picture” papers intended to address broad topics.  Submissions using information systems technology to advance education in other disciplines are also welcome.

Suggested Topics

  • Information Technology in Education
  • Virtual learning environments
  • Mobile education
  • Pedagogical and Curricular Innovations in IS education
  • Gamification
  • Assessment of IS Courses and Curricula – SIGPAA
  • The importance of IS education in functional areas
  • Social issues related to IS education
  • Ethical issues in the IS curriculum
  • Women and minorities in IS programs
  • Improving enrollments in IS programs
  • Teaching cases

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

IS Leadership and the IT Profession (SIGLEAD)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGLEAD

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Jim Denford, Royal Military College of Canada, jim.denford@rmc.ca (primary contact)
  2. Mike Eom, University of Portland, eom@up.edu

Description of Track:

The IS Leadership and the IT Profession track is aimed at fostering a forum for IS scholars engaging in a range of issues surrounding the practice of IT related research including IS leadership, the IT workforce, career development/training and issues surrounding the IT profession. Specific objectives of the track are to allow members to share their research, develop the discourse between academia and practice, engage in exchange of perspectives, and encourage future collaborations. The track is sponsored by the AIS Special Interest Group on IS Leadership (SIGLEAD) in collaboration with the Society for Information Management (SIM). This track has been led by SIGLEAD and hosted at AMCIS since 2003. The proposed track title is an evolution of the previous Human Capital in Information Systems title as the new title was determined to be more reflective of the SIGLEAD sponsorship, more reflective of growing coordination with SIM and more inclusive of the research interests of both groups.

Though articles on IS leadership and the IT profession abound in the practitioner press, much less attention has been devoted to the topic from an academic perspective. IT professionals – whether leaders at the CIO level, IS project and line staff or external professional service providers – are the human dimension of the discipline and therefore issues surrounding IT practice are of enduring concern to academics and practitioners alike. Mini-tracks will be sought to cover the range of the track interest and authors will be encouraged to submit both conceptual and empirical papers contributing to both research and practice that employ a variety of quantitative and qualitative methodologies.

Opportunities in Leading Journals (if any):

The topic is publishable in all top IS journals and opportunities for special issues with several IS journals are being sought.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

IT Project Management (SIG ITProjMgmt)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGITProjMgmt

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Dawn Owens, The University of Texas at Dallas, dawn.owens@utdallas.edu (primary contact)
  2. Alanah Mitchell, Drake University, alanah.mitchell@drake.edu

Description of Track:

Unfortunately, information technology (IT) projects have become notorious for high failure rates or having significant cost or budget overruns. Both research and anecdotal evidence suggests that many IT projects struggle to meet functionality and quality targets. Research has identified multiple reasons for these challenges in IT projects, such as: project escalation, poor risk management, failure to manage user expectations, poor software development or project management processes, or inability to learn from past mistakes and successes. The insights gained from research in this area are often highly relevant to practice and can offer new contributions to existing theory.  As a research community, there is still much to be learned and discussed about improving success rates for IT projects.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Meta-Research in Information Systems

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Michael Cuellar, Georgia Southern University, mcuellar@georgiasouthern.edu (primary contact)
  2. Duane Truex, Georgia State University, Dtruex@gsu.edu
  3. Hirotoshi Takeda, Université Laval, hirotoshi.takeda@fsa.ulaval.ca

Description of Track:

This track serves as the primary point of contribution and subsequent publication of innovative meta-research articles. Meta-research (research on research) is a venerable and valuable research stream within Information Systems. Meta-research is the discussion that goes on between IS scholars on issues surrounding the production of IS research.  It includes such areas as discussions of the structure and development of the field, the core and boundaries of the field, field legitimacy, scholar/department/journal/country ranking methods, discussions of research culture and practices, methods of evaluation of scholarship, literature reviews and research commentaries.

The purpose of the track includes showcasing unique and leading edge empirical, theoretical, and commentary papers in the area of meta-research. Typically, there has not been a good location for these types of papers within the structure of the usual tracks provided.  This track will provide a welcoming space for such papers. If successful, we look forward to subsequent tracks, workshops, and perhaps even a new SIG.

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

Selected articles will be offered fast track publication in the Journal of the Southern AIS.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Openness in Research and Practice (SIGOPEN)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGOPEN

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Matt Germonprez, University of Nebraska at Omaha, germonprez@gmail.com (primary contact)
  2. Daniel Schlagwein, University of New South Wales, (Australia) schlagwein@unsw.edu.au

Description of Proposed Track:

The track seeks research papers in all things related to “openness” and the sharing of information in organizations and society. Papers in this track will be those that share new ideas about theoretical and empirical research on the wide range of phenomena emerging at the intersection of Information Systems and various forms of legal, technological, organizational, and societal openness.

Relevant topics for papers include: New modes of knowledge creation embedded in open source and open content licensing, radical inclusivity of the crowd to share knowledge, effort and value, the tearing down of traditional organizational boundaries to enable new forms of innovation, or the reinvention of commons or open spaces to share information related to education, science, and democratic participation. Openness continues to be a transformative force that demands the rigorous and considered investigation of the Information Systems community. This track provides a forum to further our understanding of these dynamic and complex ideas.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Organizational Transformation & Information Systems (SIGOSRA)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGOSRA

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Frank Ulbrich, University of the Fraser Valley, frank.ulbrich@ufv.ca (primary contact)
  2. Paul Drews, Leuphana University of Lüneburg, paul.drews@leuphana.de
  3. Lauri Wessel, Freie Universität Berlin, lauri.wessel@fu-berlin.de

Description of Proposed Track:

By adopting, adapting, or developing Information Systems (IS), organizations and their IS continually undergo a considerable transformation often referred to as “digital transformation”.

As a result, information systems, business models, business processes, and end-user workplaces are perpetually analyzed, rethought, and changed. Nowadays, many systems in organizations are already interconnected to form inter-organizational IS, contributing to a complex IS landscape in current organizations. This renews the importance of analyzing the interplay between IS and organizations from socio-technical and end-user perspectives and the implications of changing IS on end-users and customers, who are increasingly technologically savvy and immersed in this digital transformation.

This year, we invite research papers and real-life teaching cases to be submitted on topics related to organizational transformation and IS, business process management, changing workplaces and IS integration, knowledge management and training, end-user computing, and IT consulting and inter-organizational information systems.

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

High quality and relevant papers from this track will be selected for fast-tracked development towards Internet Research (http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/intr). Selected papers will need to expand in content and length in line with the requirements for standard research articles published in the journal. Although the track co-chairs are committed to guiding the selected papers towards final publication, further reviews may be needed before final publication decision can be made.

Internet Research (IntR) is an international and refereed journal that is indexed and abstracted in major databases (e.g., SSCI, SCI, ABI/INFORM Global). The topics published in IntR are broad and interdisciplinary in nature. The 2015 impact factor of the journal is 3.017.to be announced

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Philosophy in Information Systems (SIG Philosophy)

Sponsoring SIG: SIG Philosophy

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Alan Litchfield, Auckland University of Technology, alan.litchfield@aut.ac.nz  (primary contact)
  2. Emmanuel Monod, Shanghai University of International Business and Economics, Emmanuel.monod@suibe.edu.cn

Description of Track:

In philosophy, there has long been a conversation about the impact and influence of technology on the lives of people. The relative effects are discussed in ethics, aesthetics, physics, and metaphysics and inform our conceptions of human/technology relationships.  Much of that effort has been to make sense of appearances within the human and natural domain by providing categories and frames for reference. In this sense, Kuhn (1962) seeks to understand scientific change through a scientific community’s shared theoretical beliefs, values, instruments, techniques, and metaphysics, and how it is that the community seeks to solve problems. Thus, revolutionary change represents an increase in problem solving power. In the modern world, where change is deemed a constant, we are presented with extreme cases of change and these are termed “disruptive”, and we are left with the need to reframe opportunities and understand new realities that emerge.  In Information Systems, the Internet, mobile technologies and social media may be considered as disruptive at least in markets, allowing for new technologically driven economic models, and in the theory of organization. Beyond affordance (Malhotra, Melville  & Watson, 2013), digital disruption presents failures such as ERP (Berente and Yoo, 2012) or enterprise social networks (Ou and Davison, 2016). This suggests a switch from technological determinism to a logic of opposition (Boudreau and Robey, 1999) or to the theory of practice (Levina and Orlikowski, 2009). Reimer (2103) makes the claim that digital disruption causes fundamental changes to our perception and thus, “changes the basis on which we make sense of, give meaning to, and understand our business and work-life practices.”

In this track, authors are invited to explore the concept of digital disruption, its causes and effects, its history and projections, and its trends. The track provides a broad spectrum for debate that covers epistemological considerations, methods, and philosophical traditions.

  • The topics that may be covered in the track include:
  • The new world created by social media
  • New affordances of social media and on line communities
  • The ethical application of big data analytics
  • The democratization of computing power, for example, though crytocurrencies
  • New domains for IS such as digital humanities
  • The ethical position of Artificial Intelligence
  • The shift to hyper-competition
  • The adoption of research methods and philosophical traditions to further the scope of IS research

Berente, N., & Yoo, Y. (2012). Institutional contradictions and loose coupling: Postimplementation of NASA’s enterprise information system. Information Systems Research, 23(2), 376-396.

Bourdieu, P. (1998). Practical Reason. Polity Press, Cambridge.

Husserl, E. (1954) The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology. Kluwer.

Levina, N. & Orlikowski, W.J. (2009). Understanding shifting power relations within and across organizations: a critical genre analysis. Academy of Management Journal 52(4) 672–703.

Malhotra, A., Melville, N. P., & Watson, R. T. (2013). Spurring impactful research on information systems for environmental sustainability. MIS Quarterly37(4), 1265-1274.

Ou and Davison (2016) Shaping Guanxi Networks at Work Through instant messaging Journal of the Association for information science and technology, 6 (5)

Robey, D. & Boudreau, M.C. (1999). Accounting for the contradictory organizational consequences of information technology: Theoretical directions and methodological implications. Information Systems Research, 10(2) 167-185.

Kuhn, T. (1962). The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Chicago: University of Chicago Press

Reimer, K. (2013) What is Digital Disruption? (Part 2). Retrieved from http://the-big-opportunity.blogspot.co.nz/2013/06/what-is-digital-disruption-part-2.html

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Replication Research (AIS TRR)

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Taylor Wells, Brigham Young University, taylor.wells@byu.edu (primary contact)
  2. Sue Brown, University of Arizona, suebrown@eller.arizona.edu

Description of Track:

Our focus is replications of prior research studies. All topics in IS are open for consideration. Articles will either support the findings of the original article or provide results that do not support the original article (e.g., non-significant results). Either outcome will advance science. If the original article results are replicated, then the replication provides external third-party validation of the results and a generalization of the original contribution. If the new article fails to replicate the original results, this does not mean the original results are “wrong”; just that they do not generalize to the new context, which should trigger additional replications and new follow-on research to understand the contexts in which the theory applies and why the original findings are only generalizable to those contexts.

A replication paper should briefly introduce the research area and present the results of the study being replicated before presenting the methods and results of the replication; no detailed hypotheses- or theory-building are needed because those have been presented in depth in the original article. The focus is on the results and a discussion of how they match or differ from the original article.

We seek three types of replications:

  1. Exact Replications: These articles are exact copies of the original article in terms of method and context. All measures, treatments statistical analyses, etc. will be identical to those of the original study. The context will also be the same, so if the original study used US undergraduate business students, Mechanical Turk, employees of a Finnish telecom, etc., so too will an exact replication study.
  2. Methodological Replications: These articles use exactly the same methods as the original study (i.e., measures, treatments, statistics etc.) but are conducted in a different context. For example, if the original study used US undergraduate business students, the replication might use US graduate students, undergraduates from Hong Kong, US professionals, and so on.
  3. Conceptual Replications: These articles test exactly the same research questions or hypotheses, but use different measures, treatments, and/or analyses. For example, replications might alter the wording of items used to measure key constructs or use different software to implement a treatment in an experiment. Likewise, studies that attempt to test the boundaries of the theory and the strength of a relationship using explained variance and effect sizes are particularly welcomed.

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

Selected papers will be fast-tracked for publication in AIS Transactions on Replication Research.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Semantics, Ontologies, Intelligence and Intelligent Systems (SIGODIS)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGODIS

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Don Heath, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, drheath2@gmail.com (primary contact)
  2. Vijayan Sugumaran, Oakland University, sugumara@oakland.edu

Description of Track:

The purpose of this track is to provide a forum for academics and practitioners to identify and explore the issues, opportunities, and solutions regarding computational ontologies, data driven IS, and intelligence related to business and systems including the social web, intelligent systems design, implementation, integration and deployment. An increasing number of artificial intelligence-based systems are being developed in different application domains employing a variety of tools and technologies. This track is intended to increase cross-fertilization of ideas from these areas, share lessons learned and stimulate areas for further research.

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

International Journal of Intelligent Information Technologies

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Spanish, Portuguese, and Latin America (LACAIS Chapter)

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Indira Guzman, Trident University, Indira.guzman@trident.edu (primary contact)
  2. Jose Antonio Robres-Flores, ESAN (Peru), jrobles@esan.edu.pe
  3. Carlo Bellini, Universidade Federal da Paraíba (Brasil), cgpbellini@gmail.com

Description of Track:

The AMCIS 2017 Spanish, Portuguese, and Latin America track promotes IS/IT/MIS research in and about Latin America. Latin America makes up a large part of the Americas and its population speaks primarily Spanish or Portuguese. This track opens a space for rigorous and high-quality research that is written in Spanish or Portuguese while also accepting papers in English that bring together IS/IT/MIS research and Latin America.

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

RELCASI – Revista Latinoamericana y del Caribe de la Asociación De Sistemas De Información.

RELCASI is a double-blind peer reviewed publication of the Association of Information Systems published in Spanish and Portuguese.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Social Computing

Track Co-Chairs:  

  1. Nanda Kumar, City University of New York, nanda.kumar@baruch.cuny.edu (primary contact)
  2. Sara Moussawi, Carnegie Mellon University, smoussaw@andrew.cmu.edu

Description of Track:

As the quantity of data captured about and shared by individuals has exploded over the last decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in information technologies – such as social networking platforms, collaborative filtering and reputation management systems – that facilitate social interaction among individuals. With the recognition that Social Computing straddles research at the intersection of social behavior and computing technologies, we would like to encourage papers that approach this topic from a plurality of research methods and perspectives. This track welcomes submissions that explore how these Social Computing technologies have transformed how people work, communicate, and play together.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Social Inclusion (SIGSI)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGSI

Track Co-Chairs:  

  1. Jaime Windeler, University of Cincinnati, Jaime.Windeler@uc.edu (primary contact)
  2. Hala Annabi, University of Washington, hpannabi@uw.edu

Description of Track:

The Social Inclusion track welcomes relevant theoretical, empirical, and intervention research, in either completed research or emergent research format, that relates to the mission of SIG Social Inclusion (SIGSI). The purpose of SIGSI is to promote research, pedagogy, and outreach on all aspects of social inclusion in the field of Information Systems (IS). The goal of such efforts is to stimulate greater diversity of thought and personnel in AIS and the IS field overall, and participation of all AIS members in a more socially-aware and inclusive discipline.

Social inclusion research investigates the part IT plays in enabling or inhibiting individuals and social groups’ participation in the social structures in which they exist and the needs of under-represented producers or consumers of information systems and technology within the IT field. Topics include: the underrepresentation of gender minorities, race, ethnicities, neurodiversity, and abilities in the IS field, intersectionality of identities (such as ethnicity, gender and socio-economic class), socioeconomic divisions that impact access to or use of technology, designing for the differently-abled, the digital divide, underserved groups in the information society, and a range of topics related to human diversity, and the “haves” and “have nots” in the information society.  

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

Selected completed papers may be invited to submit to The Data Base for Advances in Information Systems for full review.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Strategic and Competitive Use of Information Technology (SCUIT)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGSCUIT

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Jack D. Becker, University of North Texas, becker@unt.edu (primary contact)
  2. M. Adam Mahmood, University of Texas-El Paso, mmahmood@utep.edu
  3. Daniel Peak, University of North Texas, peak@unt.edu

Description of Track:

With the increasing success of strategic and competitive information systems in generating business value and gaining competitive advantage, businesses are more and more interested in the successful design, development, deployment, and use of these systems. Submissions to the Strategic and Competitive Use of Information Technology (SCUIT) track may include complete papers and research-in-progress, and can be conceptual, theoretical, design, empirical, or case studies.  Any research that focuses on the strategic and competitive use of IT/IS will find a home in this track.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Systems Analysis and Design (SIGSAND)

Sponsoring SIG: SIGSAND

Track Co-Chairs:  

  1. Binny Samuel, University of Cincinnati, samuelby@uc.edu (primary contact)
  2. Roman Lukyanenko, University of Saskatchewan, lukyanenko@edwards.usask.ca
  3. Arturo Castellanos, City University of New York, arturo.castellanos@baruch.cuny.edu

Description of Track:

Systems analysis involves examining business problems (opportunities) and identifying possible solutions, whereas systems design includes the identification, specification and implementation of an information technology solution.  The combined field of Systems Analysis and Design deals with all issues related to the development of systems and as such is of central importance to the Information Systems discipline, including understanding how businesses can create value with new digital technologies.  The SIGSAND track provides a forum for discussing research related to systems development tools, methodologies and other activities throughout the systems development life cycle (SDLC). This includes requirements determination, modeling techniques and languages, agile systems development practices, empirical evaluation of analysis and design methods, user involvement in systems development, open source development, design of systems architecture, and other technical and organizational issues in systems development.  Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Systems Analysis and Design: Methodologies and Processes
  • Systems Analysis and Design: Modeling Methods, Techniques, and Languages
  • Systems Analysis and Design: Requirements Elicitation, Modeling, and Validation
  • Analysis and Design for Service-Oriented Enterprises
  • Contemporary Issues in Agile Development
  • Strategic Software Management: Issues, Experiences, and Theory
  • Technical and Managerial Issues in Open Source Development
  • User Participation in Information Systems Development
  • Impact of Systems Analysis and Design on IS use (e.g., adoption, information quality)
  • Application of SAND concepts and principles beyond IS development (e.g., in data analytics)

Opportunities/Fast Tracking in Journals (if any):

All mainstream information systems journals, as well as journals in software engineering are receptive to SAND research.

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017

Virtual Communities and Collaboration

Track Co-Chairs:

  1. Gert-Jan de Vreede, University of South Florida, gdevreede@usf.edu (primary contact)
  2. Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah, Missouri University of Science and Technology, nahf@mst.edu

Description of Track:

The goal of the Virtual Communities and Collaboration track is to disseminate research and extend our knowledge and understanding of virtual communities and collaboration. Collaboration is a fundamental part of organizations and organizational partnerships. Following a continuing trend toward globalization, virtual communities and collaboration are an increasingly important part of organizations. Virtual communities are collective groups of individuals who utilize computer-mediated environments to interact and pursue mutual goals. They can be found in virtual worlds, social media and crowdsourcing sites, among others. Organizations and teams can use computer-mediated environments to improve their processes and outcomes, yet collaboration technologies do not foster value-creation by themselves. Researchers and practitioners need to address behavioral, social, cognitive, and technical issues.  Research areas range from design issues in collaboration systems, sense of community and engagement in virtual communities, to impact of virtual communities and collaboration in domains as diverse as business, education, and government. This track aims to solicit contributions from a range of epistemological and methodological perspectives to extend our understanding of virtual communities and collaboration to enhance the theoretical foundation for research, share important empirical findings related to these venues, and provide guidance to practitioners. Virtual communities and collaboration play a major role in understanding and influencing information systems phenomena and impact, and hence, is an important topic to include as an AMCIS conference track.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • The design, development, deployment, use, and evaluation of virtual communities in business and educational settings
  • Individual and group behaviors in virtual communities and collaboration
  • Collaboration among and interplay between virtual communities, and the impact of these environments on participants and communities
  • Individual and group behaviors, processes, and governance mechanisms in virtual communities and collaboration
  • The role of individual attitudes and characteristics on behaviors, processes and outcomes in virtual communities and collaboration
  • Ethics, privacy, security, and trust issues in virtual communities and collaboration
  • Intra- and inter-organizational communication and collaboration and cultural issues in virtual communities associated with social media, crowdsourcing and virtual worlds
  • Business and economic models of virtual communities associated with crowdsourcing, social media, and virtual worlds
  • Power and political issues related to individual, group, organizational, and societal behaviors in virtual communities and collaborations
  • Organizational and societal impacts of social networking in virtual communities and collaboration
  • Applications of virtual communities and collaboration in different social/cultural settings and business domains
  • Novel and innovative applications of virtual communities and collaboration
  • Social analytics and big data analytics of virtual communities and collaboration
  • Business implications of virtual reality and augmented reality
  • Methodological and measurement advances in virtual communities and collaboration

Mini-tracks will be available in Oct. 2017